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FAQs

Get answers to the most frequently asked questions about each program

FAQs

What is the difference between the IAR CSOMT and the Orthopedic Residency?

The IAR CSOMT is a formalized program that is self paced and requires the successful completion of 5 components in no specific order: Core Concepts (online) and Clinical Management Series 1 – 4 (in person weekend intensives). The information incorporated in the CSOMT is suited for clinicians who treat primarily treat the orthopedic population but want to elevate their clinical reasoning and intervention skills in treatment of the more active and sports populations. The CSOMT is highly recommended for young clinicians with 1 – 3 years of experience who are interested in carving a “niche” for themselves towards the sports population.

 

The IAR SMTC is a formalized weekend course that is completed in only 2 or 3 days. The information incorporated in the SMTC is suited for clinicians (Sports PT and Athletic Trainers) who primarily work with amateur and professional athletes. The SMTC is manual therapy technique heavy with 90% of it being hands on lab combined with clinical reasoning applied to the audience’s target athlete. The goal of the SMTC is to expose the clinician to the most effective treatment techniques and manual therapy “sequences” to increase efficiency in the training room. This course is also highly recommended for university entry level athletic training programs interested in providing their students the benefits of manual therapy.

 

The table below will provide a side by side picture of the components for each program. 

What is the difference between the IAR CSOMT and the Orthopedic Residency?

The IAR CSOMT is a formalized program that is self paced and requires the successful completion of 5 components in no specific order: Core Concepts (online) and Clinical Management Series 1 – 4 (in person weekend intensives). The information incorporated in the CSOMT is suited for clinicians who treat primarily treat the orthopedic population but want to elevate their clinical reasoning and intervention skills in treatment of the more active and sports populations. The CSOMT is highly recommended for young clinicians with 1 – 3 years of experience who are interested in carving a “niche” for themselves towards the sports population.

 

The IAR SMTC is a formalized weekend course that is completed in only 2 or 3 days. The information incorporated in the SMTC is suited for clinicians (Sports PT and Athletic Trainers) who primarily work with amateur and professional athletes. The SMTC is manual therapy technique heavy with 90% of it being hands on lab combined with clinical reasoning applied to the audience’s target athlete. The goal of the SMTC is to expose the clinician to the most effective treatment techniques and manual therapy “sequences” to increase efficiency in the training room. This course is also highly recommended for university entry level athletic training programs interested in providing their students the benefits of manual therapy. 

For the CSOMT, Residency, and Fellowship programs, do I have to take the weekend courses in a specific order?

Clinicians who enroll in the CSOMT and Residency programs do not have to complete the weekend intensive (CM 1 – 4) requirements in order. However, for clinicians enrolled in the Fellowship, it is highly recommended the clinician complete the clinical management series (CM 1 – 4) BEFORE starting the advanced clinical management series (ACM 1 – 4). This will provide the clinician a solid foundation of information prior to jumping into the more advanced portions of the Fellowship. For clinicians who are interested in completing the Fellowship at a faster pace (minimum 10 months), we will allow completion of the weekend intensives per body region, ie CM 1 and ACM 1 can be completed sequentially, followed by CM 2 and ACM 2.

For the Residency and Fellowship programs, does my mentor have to be an IAR graduate?

Clinicians in the residency and fellowship will be allowed to mentor with their preferred mentor. This mentor does not need to be an IAR graduate. However, the IAR faculty will need to approve the preferred mentor to ensure this individual is fully committed to the process and willing to mentor on behalf of IAR. We encourage residents and fellows in training to select multiple mentors if possible to gain exposure to different types of mentoring approaches and personalities. We strongly feel being exposed to different mentors and advantageous to the clinician’s overall development.  If you are unable to locate a mentor, we will assist in finding you the right “fit”.

For the Residency and Fellowship, when should I start my mentoring hours and what does the schedule for mentoring look like?

It is recommended that residents begin mentoring soon after beginning their respective programs. Clinicians enrolled in the full time network track will begin based on the schedule that is created by their host clinic and host clinic mentor. Clinicians enrolled in the independent part time Residency track will have 60 months to complete the 150 hours of mentoring with an approved board certified clinician. We encourage residents in the part time track to begin their mentoring once they have completed Core Concepts and Clinical Management Series 1 – 2.

 

Clinicians participating in the IAR Fellowship also have 60 months to complete 150 hours of mentoring with an approved Fellowship trained Manual Therapist (FAAOMPT). We encourage Fellows in training to begin their mentoring once they have completed Core Concepts and Clinical Management Series 1 – 4. This will allow the Fellow in training to have a solid foundation of advanced knowledge prior to working with a mentor in the clinic.

 

For clinicians completing the independent Residency track and Fellowship, the mentoring schedule will be created by the student and the selected faculty mentor. IAR does not allow faculty mentors to travel to the student’s clinic, so the student will need to seek approval with their direct supervisor in order to travel to the mentor’s clinic. Examples of common mentoring schedules include traveling to the mentor’s clinic two half days per week and/or working 4-10s, and taking the 5th day to work with the faculty mentor. Traveling and altering schedules can be avoided if the student works in the same clinic as the selected faculty mentor. We encourage the student to find the most convenient situation, but not to sacrifice a quality experience with an excellent mentor for convenience in schedule. Again, the student has 60 months to complete the 150 hours of mentoring.

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The Institute for Athlete Regeneration, LLC  (IAR) does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, military status, sexual orientation, or age. IAR is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in all aspects of its continuing education activities. Participants who have special needs are encouraged to contact program organizers so that all reasonable efforts to accomodate these needs are made. 

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INSTITUTE FOR ATHLETE REGENERATION